ML Model Evaluation Technique

Think Different - Dhiraj Patra
3 min readDec 25, 2023

Photo by Ann H

Model evaluation is a crucial step in the machine learning lifecycle to assess how well a trained model performs on unseen data. Different evaluation techniques provide insights into various aspects of a model’s performance. Here are some common model evaluation techniques along with brief explanations and examples:

1. Confusion Matrix:

- Explanation: A confusion matrix is a table that describes the performance of a classification model. It shows the number of True Positives (TP), True Negatives (TN), False Positives (FP), and False Negatives (FN).

- Example:

```

Actual Class 1 Actual Class 0

Predicted Class 1 TP FP

Predicted Class 0 FN TN

```

2. Accuracy:

- Explanation: Accuracy is the ratio of correctly predicted instances to the total instances. It provides a general idea of the model’s performance but might not be suitable for imbalanced datasets.

- Example:

```

Accuracy = (TP + TN) / (TP + TN + FP + FN)

```

3. Precision, Recall, and F1-Score:

- Explanation:

- Precision (Positive Predictive Value) is the ratio of correctly predicted positive observations to the total predicted positives.

- Recall (Sensitivity or True Positive Rate) is the ratio of correctly predicted positive observations to the all observations in the actual class.

- F1-Score is the harmonic mean of precision and recall, providing a balance between the two.

- Examples:

```

Precision = TP / (TP + FP)

Recall = TP / (TP + FN)

F1-Score = 2 * (Precision * Recall) / (Precision + Recall)

```

4. ROC Curve and AUC-ROC:

- Explanation:

- Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve is a graphical representation of a model’s ability to discriminate between positive and negative classes.

- Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC-ROC) provides a single value summarizing the model’s performance across different classification thresholds.

- Example:

- AUC-ROC ranges from 0 to 1, with higher values indicating better performance.

5. Mean Squared Error (MSE) and Mean Absolute Error (MAE) for Regression:

- Explanation:

- MSE measures the average squared difference between actual and predicted values.

- MAE measures the average absolute difference between actual and predicted values.

- Examples:

```

MSE = (1/n) * Σ(actual_i — predicted_i)²

MAE = (1/n) * Σ|actual_i — predicted_i|

```

Selecting a Specific Evaluation Technique:

- Accuracy: Suitable for balanced datasets without a significant class imbalance.

- Precision, Recall, F1-Score: Useful when there is an imbalance in the class distribution, and the cost of false positives or false negatives is different.

- ROC Curve and AUC-ROC: Effective for binary classification problems, especially when the trade-off between sensitivity and specificity needs to be understood.

- MSE, MAE: Appropriate for regression problems where the focus is on measuring the deviation of predicted values from actual values.

The choice of evaluation metric depends on the nature of the problem, the dataset characteristics, and the business requirements. It’s common to consider a combination of metrics to gain a comprehensive understanding of a model’s performance.

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Think Different - Dhiraj Patra

I am a Software architect for AI, ML, IoT microservices cloud applications. Love to learn and share. https://dhirajpatra.github.io